Posts Tagged ‘pencil drawing’

All the Abused – Eyes Pencil Drawing

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

All the Abused - Black Eye Pencil Drawing by Faith Te

All the Abused
by Faith Te

Graphite Pencil Drawing on Arches Paper
Size: 18 x 13 cm (7″ x 5″)

All the Abused is a rock band from southern California. In mid-2009, they commissioned me to do a pencil drawing of a pair of eyes to use as the band’s logo. For reference, I used pictures of lead vocalist and guitarist, Sky Green, wearing her signature black eye.

Their latest CD album, released in January, is entitled “A Never Ending Story”. They sent me a copy so I took a few pictures. Here is one showing the CD along with their logo.

All the Abused CD - A Never Ending Story - With Logo

I like how all the songs in the album convey a message of peace. I am privileged that All the Abused asked me to do the artwork for the logo. Please visit their web site to learn more about All the Abused, to purchase their CD, listen to their songs, or to get in touch: http://alltheabused.com/. Here are a few more pictures:

All the Abused CD - A Never Ending Story Front   All the Abused CD - A Never Ending Story Back   All the Abused CD with Pencil Drawing Logo   All the Abused CD with Pencil Drawing Logo  

I will be posting another commissioned drawing soon which I did also last year, so please stay tuned for that.

Faith

Portrait of Tammy – Pencil Drawing

Tuesday, December 29th, 2009

Portrait of Tammy Hext - Pencil Drawing

Portrait of Tammy
Medium: Graphite Pencil
Paper: Canson Grain
Size: 20 x 25 cm (8″ x 10″)

Faith and I have been neglecting this blog for sometime now. To start things rolling again, here’s a pencil portrait I did for Karin Jurick’s Different Strokes from Different Folks Year End Portrait Swap. The terms of the portrait swap was simple: participating artists sent pictures of themselves and, in turn, Ms. Jurick gave each artist a photo of another artist to draw or paint.

I was paired up with artist Tammy Hext. This lovely lady painted my portrait and I think she captured my character and personality perfectly.

Here’s a little behind the scenes look at the drawing I did of her. Before, I would usually take my time rendering a part of the face or skin with a pencil. This time, I used a flat brush dipped in a little graphite powder to lay down the first or basic layers of skin tone. Then, with the 2H Staedtler wood cased pencil, I laid down the second layer by making a chain of continuous diagonal strokes instead of the usual circular strokes. I blended it all together with a small piece of toilet paper. I hope you like it.

David

Graphite Pencil Drawing Tutorial: Female Nose

Friday, November 30th, 2007

Here is a female nose to go along with the female eye tutorial I did. This tutorial demonstrates how I render noses as realistically as I can, using mostly direct application of graphite. I hope you will find the following images and descriptions informative and helpful as a guide in drawing noses. Many thanks to Toni-Marie Hudson for the use of her picture as reference for this tutorial.

Step 1: Here is the outline on 8.2 x 10.1 cm (3.25″ x 4″) Canson paper. The highlights have also been lightly indicated.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 1

Step 2:  I’ve used a Chinese brush to apply the initial 2 or 3 layers of graphite powder. This brush produces a smoother effect than the soft brush I used in the eye tutorial. I applied the graphite powder in very light layers, adding more as needed. This is the base tone and it helps make additional layers of graphite tone smoother.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 2

Step 3: I began using a small soft brush for the edges and for the darker areas.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 3

Step 4:  Taking the kneaded eraser, I lightly and carefully, tap some of the tones off the highlights on the bridge of the nose, the ball of the nose, and below the nostrils. The Chinese brush was used to dull the highlights a little bit.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 4

Step 5: Using a 0.5 mm 2B Dong-A mechanical pencil, I drew the nostrils. Less pressure was used as I came near the skin below the nostrils.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 5

Step 6: Using a 0.5 mm HB Dong-A mechanical pencil, I began darkening the lower area of the nose. I also lessened the sharpness of the edges of the nostrils by gradually darkening the skin around them. To blend the tones, I used the small brush and a shop towel. It helps if the shop towel employed for blending and smoothening pencil marks is used. New, clean ones tend to pick up tone instead of spread them around.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 6

Step 7: More skin tones using the HB mechanical pencil were added to the middle and upper parts of the nose. Most of the outlines have been smudged off and erased at this point.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 7

Step 8: The skin on the sides of the nose and the nostril wings have been darkened. This created a more three-dimensional effect. For blending, I used the shop towel and the two brushes. A clean shop towel was used to lift excess graphite tone from the drawing. In this stage, I have also started making necessary corrections to capture the likeness of the subject.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 8

Step 9: The tones were further blended. It’s almost finished.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 9

Step 10: The final stage of the nose. For the finishing touches, the tools I used mainly were: a 0.5 mm 2B mechanical pencil with the tip sharpened using fine sandpaper — this was used for filling up light spots; a clean shop towel for lightening up graphite pencil tones; and a kneaded eraser for removing dark spots. Finalizing my “serious” works is usually the most difficult stage of the whole drawing process. It takes quite a long time to do as well.

Female Nose Pencil Drawing Tutorial Finished

I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial of a female nose.

Happy drawing!

Faith :)

Graphite Pencil Drawing Tutorial: Male Eye

Friday, November 16th, 2007

I prefer to render drawings, especially portraits, in the realistic style. My method varies from drawing to drawing or from portrait to portrait because I like to improve my ability in working with that style. I hope this tutorial can be of help in some way. First, let me mention the things I used for this tutorial:

  • A soft brush
  • 0.5 mm 2B (Dong-A), HB (Faber-Castell) and B (Staedtler) mechanical pencils
  • 4H, 5H and 6H wooden pencils
  • A shop towel
  • A kneaded eraser
  • A lot of patience :)

The paper being used is Canson Grain. I draw on the reverse side because the other side is too rough. The size is 11.5 x 12 cm (4.5″ x 4.75″). Let’s start!

Step 1: The outline was first drawn on a small piece of bond paper and then transferred to the Canson paper using the graphite transfer method.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 1

Step 2: With a soft, thin brush, I applied 2 to 3 layers of graphite powder while avoiding the highlights. If I do get any graphite there, I would clean them with a kneaded eraser before moving to the next step. Because the first few brush strokes are darker, which you may not want, just take off excess graphite powder from the brush by rubbing it on a piece of paper. Then, the skin around the eye is covered with a 4H wooden pencil.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 2

Step 3: With a 0.5 mm HB mechanical pencil, I continued the underpainting and then blended with the brush.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 3

Step 4: Going back to the same brush, I began rendering the eye itself avoiding the highlights if possible. With the 0.5 mm 2B mechanical pencil, I did the pupil. For the iris, I drew spokes originating from the pupil by means of a 6H wooden pencil. Then using the 2B mechanical, I darkened it — especially the shadow under the upper eyelid and its edges. Used the kneaded eraser to pull some soft highlights.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 4

Step 5: 5H wooden pencil and a light touch are used on the white of the eye to make it smooth and also to keep it from receiving a lot of graphite when the eyeball is established using primarily 0.5 mm B and 2B mechanical pencils. Lastly, B mechanical pencil is used for the tear duct. In this stage, I made some corrections on the tear duct and the crease of the eyelid.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 5

Step 6: Rendered the lower eyelid with HB, B and 2B mechanical pencils while 5H and B were used on its thickness.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 6

Step 7: The same thing was done on the upper eyelid. Applied 2B under the crease to make the upper eyelid “go in”.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 7

Step 8: Established the skin tones above the crease which is then blended with a brush dipped in a bit of graphite powder.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 8

Step 9: With a B mechanical pencil, I rendered the skin under the eye so it will be lighter in tone than the one above.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 9

Step 10: Applied HB, B and 2B mechanical pencils on the side of the nose and the eyebrow area. Blended this with the brush and shop towel.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 10

Step 11: Following its growth, the eyebrow is drawn using a 2B mechanical pencil.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 11

Finished: Saved the eyelashes until the skin underneath is done. To draw them, I sharpened the 2B mechanical pencil to a pointed tip. I started from the base of each hair, getting thinner as it ends at its tip. The upper eyelashes should be darker than the lower. Finally, I did some finishing touches on the skin tones. It’s finished. I hope you like it.

Male Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Finished

From the Art Studio,

David ;)

Portrait of Ankong: Stage 1 – Pencil Drawing

Monday, November 12th, 2007

Portrait of Ankong 1 by David and Faith TeOn the easel, I am working on a portrait of my grandfather (father’s side). Because it’s quite large, my sister, Faith, will be helping me with this. She will render the hair, clothes, and background while my part will be from the forehead up to the neck. This is quite an experiment since this is the first time we have collaborated on a single portrait. Here is the cropped version of the first stage to show the progress of the portrait so far. I am using graphite pencil on Canson Grain paper. The size is 46 x 61 cm (18″ x 24″).

From the Art Studio,

David :)

Portrait of Grandfather: Finished – Pencil Drawing

Wednesday, November 7th, 2007

Portrait of Grandfather by Faith Te

Here is my latest finished drawing. I drew this as a present for Grandfather’s 90th birthday. I was going for a sketchy look and used linear pencil strokes instead of the usual light circular motions I use for tighter, more-detailed drawings. This took about half the time I usually spend on graphite pencil portraits using my usual method. I hope you like it and please feel free to comment.

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Medium: Graphite Pencil and White Pastel

Paper: Canson Grain

Size: 28 x 36 cm (11″ x 14″)

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From the Art Studio,

Faith

Graphite Pencil Drawing Tutorial: Female Eye

Wednesday, October 31st, 2007

Here is the first tutorial from Art Studio — a female eye. My method in graphite pencil drawing aims to render subjects as realistically as I can. The following is a step-by-step demonstration of how I draw eyes. While I very much hope that it helps you in drawing realistic eyes, do experiment and develop your own way of drawing. I myself sometimes do not follow some of the steps exactly as I like to experiment and try to find better ways of achieving a specific texture or effect. Before I begin, many thanks to Toni-Marie Hudson for the use of her picture. Toni-Marie does animal paintings in mixed media. Visit her web site to view her extremely realistic paintings.

Step 1: The outline on Canson Grain. Since the outline was very light and will likely be smudged off when I start rendering or shading, I have carefully and lightly retraced the lines with a soft pencil. In this case, a Faber-Castell 0.5 mm 2B mechanical pencil.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 1

Step 2: Using a soft brush dipped in small amounts of graphite powder, I cover the outline with two or three layers of tone. Any brush can be used as long as it produces a very smooth effect and fills in the tooth of the paper. I try to avoid getting tone on the highlight of the iris. If I do get any graphite there, I tap the area with a clean kneaded eraser.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 2

Step 3: Using a smaller version of the brush I used in the previous step, I begin forming the shapes of the eye by defining the darker areas.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 3

Step 4: With a kneaded eraser, I cleaned up the highlights.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 4

Step 5: I used a Dong-A 0.5 mm 2B mechanical pencil to draw the darkest areas like the pupil, shadow on the upper part of the iris and the crease of the upper eyelid.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 5

Step 6: Concentrating on the iris for now, I use a hard pencil (5H Staedtler) and fairly hard pressure to draw spokes originating from the pupil. This will keep the paper from absorbing a lot of graphite in the next stage.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 6

Step 7: Having used a 5H on the previous stage, I can now draw darker shades on the iris using a dark pencil (2B mechanical pencil). The reason why I use 2B is because it spreads more easily. The 5H is also to keep the tones very smooth when darker tones are added.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 7

Step 8: I further worked on the iris erasing and adding graphite as much as needed to create varied tones. Moving on to the white of the eye, it was also covered with a layer of 5H to create a smooth effect. Then I used a 2B mechanical pencil on the shadow areas to form the eyeball.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 8

Step 9: Here I began working on the skin. Using a 0.5 mm HB mechanical pencil and a light circular motion, I added tones to the upper eyelid and the surrounding skin — starting first on an area which will receive more graphite (in this case, the skin around the crease) and moving towards lighter areas. I used a shop towel and a brush to smoothen out rough spots.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 9

Step 10: Continued with the lower part of the skin.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 10

Step 11: Still continuing with the HB mechanical pencil. I’ve now added shadows to the skin. The 5H Staedtler pencil was also used on the thickness of the lower eyelid. 2B mechanical pencil was used for its darker areas.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 11

Step 12: To create the wrinkles on the skin, I lightly drew lines with the HB mechanical pencil and then used a kneaded eraser to create fine highlights beside each line. A paper stump and a brush were used to soften and blend the lines. The same method used on the white of the eye was also used on the tear duct. The HB was used for the eyebrow — starting with the root of each hair and lessening pressure towards the tip.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 12

Step 13: I always try to keep from drawing the eyelashes until the skin underneath is finished. Since the upper eyelashes will be darker than the lower eyelashes or the eyebrow, I used a Dong-A 2B mechanical pencil which is much darker than a Faber-Castell of the same grade. Again, following the direction of growth and starting from the root, lessening pressure as I come to the tip. Reflections of the eyelashes were also drawn on the highlight of the iris.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 13

Step 14: The lower eyelashes were drawn with the Faber-Castell 2B mechanical pencil.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Step 14

Step 15: The final eye. Finishing touches were made and some of the highlights on the lower eyelid were dulled a little. I hope you find these steps and images informative and helpful.

Female Eye Pencil Drawing Tutorial Finished

Happy drawing,

Faith :)